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Mechanizing Proof: Computing, Risk, and Trust (Inside Technology), Mackenzie, Donald
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Author Name    Mackenzie, Donald

Title   Mechanizing Proof: Computing, Risk, and Trust (Inside Technology)

Binding   Paperback

Book Condition   Used - Good

Publisher    The MIT Press 2004-01-30 00:00:00.000

ISBN Number    0262632950 / 9780262632959

Seller ID   Z1-X-001-01354

Ships from UK in 48 hours or less (usually same day). Your purchase helps support the African Children's Educational Trust (A-CET). Ex-library, so some stamps and wear, and may have sticker on cover, but in good overall condition. 100% money back guarantee. We are a world class secondhand bookstore based in Hertfordshire, United Kingdom and specialize in high quality textbooks across an enormous variety of subjects. We aim to provide a vast range of textbooks, rare and collectible books at a great price. Through our work with A-CET we have helped give hundreds of young people in Africa the vital chance to get an education. We provide a 100% money back guarantee and are dedicated to providing our customers with the highest standards of service in the bookselling industry.

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Most aspects of our private and social lives -- our safety, the integrity of the financial system, the functioning of utilities and other services, and national security -- now depend on computing. But how can we know that this computing is trustworthy? In Mechanizing Proof, Donald MacKenzie addresses this key issue by investigating the interrelations of computing, risk, and mathematical proof over the last half century from the perspectives of history and sociology. His discussion draws on the technical literature of computer science and artificial intelligence and on extensive interviews with participants.MacKenzie argues that our culture now contains two ideals of proof: proof as traditionally conducted by human mathematicians, and formal, mechanized proof. He describes the systems constructed by those committed to the latter ideal and the many questions those systems raise about the nature of proof. He looks at the primary social influence on the development of automated proof -- the need to predict the behavior of the computer systems upon which human life and security depend -- and explores the involvement of powerful organizations such as the National Security Agency. He concludes that in mechanizing proof, and in pursuing dependable computer systems, we do not obviate the need for trust in our collective human judgment.

Price = 17.68 GBP



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